Pilgrim bids farewell to class of 2017

pilgrim peter

Peter Mallen with Sean Winter.

Pilgrim Theological College rounded off the academic year last week with a valedictory service to farewell those who had completed or were completing an award, as well as one candidate who was exiting for ordination as a minister with the Uniting Church.

The service was held at the Centre of Theology and Ministry in Parkville on Thursday evening with 12 of this year’s 22 valedictorians attending along with faculty members and family and friends.

Those who attended were given with a card and a candle by Pilgrim Acting Head of College and Academic Dean Sean Winter, while ministry candidate Peter Mallen was presented with a cross to be held during prayers and a candle.

The valedictorians who are completing qualifications will graduate from the University of Divinity at a later date.

Dr Winter gave the valedictory address and warmly congratulated those who completed their studies or “were on the verge” of completing their studies.

He went on to speak about the concept of mind, both human and divine.

“Whatever the future holds, keep the questions you have asked here, the challenges you have faced here, the insights you have won here, the knowledge you have gained here, the changes you have made here, keep them at the forefront of your mind and go on living with them,” Dr Winter told the valedictorians.

Mr Mallen, who had been in Pilgrim’s formation program for two years while also being in placement as a lay pastor at Rosanna Uniting Church in Melbourne’s north-east, said leaving Pilgrim was just part of a 20-year journey into ministry.

He is now awaiting the discernment of the church as to which congregation he could be placed at for ordained ministry.

Mr Mallen said the formation period had been important to help him understand his call to ministry with questions that had taken a long time to resolve.

“For me personally, what is the difference between ministry as an ordained person and ministry and as a lay pastor?” Mr Mallen said.

“So that’s been important to wrestle with.”

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2 Responses to “Pilgrim bids farewell to class of 2017”

  1. Alan English Reply

    Between you me, you and the gate post I have been a Presbyterian elder, ordained at Hobart, Scot’s as one 3 on the same day, each of us being 29 years of age. I had entertained becoming a minister and put in over a year at the University labouring jobs to make ends meet, but in my 2nd year at the end of the 2st semester my funds were so low that I pulled the plug to re, ,turn to Victoria. Hector Dunn, the n minister at Scot’s said to me why didn’t you ask help from Presbytery? All I could say that it wasn’t suggested to me. In reflection I had thought myself too immature and had become a minister I would have very ordinary traditional minister.
    As it turned out, it was from the frying pan into the fire. For 15n years as I say I fought in the trenches of the Junior Technical schools. My authority in Agriculture lay unquestioned and I had a free act as I saw fit However, I was lumbered with teaching junior science and Maths. I had come in in 1960 as temporary teacher when babies born to soldiers overloaded the system anyone with some basic knowledge was in. I was only given in my 2nd year about 2 1/2 days a week at Burwood Technical college with the remainder of training on the job at Ringwood supervised by the head of the dept and few specialist teachers from the college. I graduate and was appointed to the Colac Junior Technical school. That was the year in which we were married
    To cut long story short I came Shepparton where I lasted my 10 years when I was superannuated out as with mental illness. it didn’t end there as from one year later I was seconded to coordinate voluntary driving for needy people for health and ate allied needs. I had a team of about 7 or 8 to do this, but they required a day’s notice. Should an urgent case come in no matter what I was doing I had to drop order to meet that situation. This went on for 20 years until I needed a prostrate operation, and the then the City Council took over for 2 years & then closed it down. Yes, I was inducted here in 1967 and served on the Kirk session as and into Union . It was a time of mental relapse & thus I retired saying will stay my resignation till screws are put in. So, I am put out to grass now.. My wife nearly 10 years my senior having in January 2013. And as it goes, still there is more, in 2014 I had ear infection in both ears. It was during this period I began a study of reading theology from the best theologians available and from that over the next 4 n years I have written a host items, a few of which been printed in our local magazine “on the VINE” By the way, our minister Rosalie, was born at almost the same time as we three elders were ordained in Hobart. Amen

  2. Alan English Reply

    Between you me, you and the gate post I have been a Presbyterian elder, ordained at Hobart, Scot’s as one 3 on the same day, each of us being 29 years of age. I had entertained becoming a minister and put in over a year at the University and doing labouring jobs to make ends meet, but in my 2nd year, at the end of the 2st semester, my funds were so low that , why didn’t you ask help from Presbytery? All I could say that it wasn’t suggested to me. In reflection I had thought myself too immature to become a minister I would have very ordinary traditional minister.
    As it turned out, it was from the frying pan into the fire. For 15 years, as I say, I fought in the trenches of the Junior Technical schools. My authority in Agriculture lay unquestioned and I had a free hand to act as I saw fit However, I was lumbered with teaching junior science and Maths. I had come in 1960 as temporary teacher when babies born to soldiers overloaded the system. Anyone with some basic knowledge was in. During my 2nd year( I was only given in my 2nd year about 2 1/2 days a week at Burwood Technical college) and with the remainder of training on the job at Ringwood supervised by the head of the dept and few specialist teachers from the college. I graduated and was appointed to the Colac Junior Technical school. That was the year in which we were married. It was a joyful happy period there. Later I was called to Mildura to take bigger classes. I was an Agricultural teacher, but was loaded up with science and Junior Maths to complete my 32 periods out 40.
    To cut long story short I came Shepparton where I lasted my 10 years when I was superannuated out as with mental illness. it didn’t end there as from one year later I was seconded to coordinate voluntary driving for needy people for health and allied needs. I had a team of about 7 or 8 to do this, but they required a day’s notice. Should an urgent case come in, no matter what I was doing I had to drop it in order to meet that situation. This went on for 20 years until I needed a prostrate operation, and the then the City Council took over for 2 years & then closed it down. Yes, I was inducted here in 1967 and served on the Kirk session as and into Union until 2002. . It was a time of mental relapse & thus I retired saying I will stay my resignation till screws are put in. So, I am put out to grass now.. My wife nearly 10 years my senior, died in January 2013. And as it goes, still there is more, in 2014 I had ear infection in both ears. It was during this period I began a study of reading theology from the best theologians available and from that time over the next 4 n years I have written a host items, a few of which been printed in our local magazine “on the VINE” By the way, our minister Rosalie, was born at almost the same time as we three elders were ordained in Hobart. (there is no riding into the sunset); it is as seen the gospel of Luke ” we carry our cross, day after day after day into infinity. So be it, Come Lord Jesus Come

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